Publication Date

April 2018

Advisor(s)

Jennifer Tucker

Major

History (HIST)

Language

English (United States)

Abstract

The period from 1688 to 1707 was one of extraordinary upheaval in Scotland, characterized by succession disputes, rebellion, economic downturn, crop failures and famine, trade wars, failed colonial ventures, and repeated attempts to unify Scotland and England. This thesis argues that it was in these tumultuous two decades, bracketed by the Glorious Revolution of 1688-1689 and the Union of 1707, that a sense of Scottish national identity began to emerge. More specifically, I will be analyze how this identity formation can be seen in?and was propagated by?the concurrent popular print culture, the output of which dramatically spiked during this time of crisis and controversy. Several "crisis points" are focused on specifically: the Glorious Revolution, Glencoe Massacre, Darien scheme, Worcester incident, and Union of 1707.

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